Basic Chicken Stock

Chicken Stock IngredientsEvery poultry-eating cook needs a go-to chicken stock recipe. I never had one until recently as the yield from my single roasted chicken didn’t seem worth the effort. But, now I can’t imagine wasting a single carcass and simply wait until I have two of them. After all the meat has been eaten, I throw the bones  into a freezer bag, along with any kitchen scraps collected from juicing and cooking during the week (mostly carrot, celery, leek and onion ends). I also save onion skins, as they impart a pleasant caramel color to the stock. Continue reading

Cilantro Yogurt Roasted Chicken

Cilantro Yogurt Roasted Chicken

Cilantro Yogurt Roasted Chicken just might be one of the most tender and moist birds you’ll ever serve. The magic is in the marinade. Specifically, the yogurt’s lactic acid gently tenderizes the meat. The tangy marinade also doubles as a vibrant dipping sauce. No need to shy away from this recipe if you’re not a yogurt fan or are lactose intolerant. The yogurt is actually wiped off the bird before roasting. Don’t let the words ‘advance planning’ deter you. This recipe is worth it.  Continue reading

Splayed Roasted Chicken

Splayed Roast edChicken

Like many people, I once shied away from cooking whole birds. Melissa Clark changed all that. This twist on a classic roasted chicken recipe is simple reliable, and fun to prepare. Combining a high temperature, salting, a heavy pan and the splayed legs results in an evenly cooked bird (breasts and legs), crunchy skin and perfectly carmelized vegetables. Now, like clock-work, Sunday is Bird Day. Thanks to leftovers, Monday is Bird Day Part II. I love cooking, but not on Mondays. Freeze the carcass and make chicken stock when you have two or more ready to go.

Continue reading

Basic Chicken Stock

Chicken Stock IngredientsEvery poultry-eating cook needs a go-to stock recipe. I never had one until recently as the yield from my single roasted chicken didn’t seem worth the effort. But, now I can’t imagine wasting a single carcass and simply wait until I have two of them. After all the meat has been eaten, I throw the bones  into a freezer bag, along with any kitchen scraps collected from juicing and cooking during the week (mostly carrot, celery, leek and onion ends). I also save onion skins, as they impart a pleasant caramel color to the stock. Continue reading